Travel to Turkey (Release-3)

Whirling Dervishes at the Galata Mevlevihanesi

The Whirling Dervishes is a Turkish experience that many come to Turkey wanting to see, it truly is an amazing performance to witness. This excursion is not like the other Turkish nights on offer in Cappadocia, as it only has the Whirling Dervishes; no other dances are performed on the night. The programme starts with an introduction about Rumi, followed by Sufi Music and the 4-salam “sema ceremony”, giving life to 800 years tradition on the stage with their determination and faith for being a lifelong follower of Mevlevi tradition.

The Mevlevi Sema Ceremony represents the mystical journey of man’s spritual ascent through mind and love to perfection. It is one of the most important heritage of Turkish Culture as a tradition of 800 years old . This unique traditional ritual had been proclaimed as Intangible Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO in 2005.

The dance troupe represents one branch of the Sufi tradition of Islam that focuses on love, tolerance and the worship of God. Wearing long, flowing robes and tall hats, the Whirling Dervishes twirl to live music played on ancient instruments, a form of worship said to bring them closer to God. It lasts about 45 minutes under the amazing lighting and accompanied by 360 degree video special effects projected on the wall of beautiful historic building.

The venue has limited seat capacity so the best way to assure that you’ll be able to see the dervishes is to reserve your tickets a day or more in advance of what you want to see.

kaymakli_underground_city

Kaymaklı is a city dug deep into the soft volcanic rock in the Cappadocia region. There are around 100 underground cities in the area although only a few are open to the public. Kaymaklı is the largest of them. It is estimated that around 3,500 people once lived here. Kaymakli underground city is built under the hill known as the Citadel of Kaymakli and was opened to visitors in 1964. The people of Kaymakli (Enegup in Greek) village have constructed their houses around nearly one hundred tunnels of the underground city. The inhabitants of the region still use the most convenient places in the tunnels as cellars, storage areas and stables, which they access through their courtyards. The Kaymakli Underground City has low, narrow and sloping passages. While the underground city consists of 8 floors below ground, only 4 of them are open to the public today, in which the spaces are organized around ventilation shafts.

The Derinkuyu underground city is located in the same named town Derinkuyu, which is situated 40km from Goreme (30 minute drive). There are about 600 outside doors to the city, hidden in the courtyards of surface dwellings. The underground city is approximately 85m deep. It contains all the usual rooms found in an underground city (stables, cellars, storage rooms, refectories, churches, wineries etc.) Apart from these, a large room with a barrel vaulted ceiling on the second floor was a missionary school, the rooms to the left being study rooms.

It is unlikely that the underground cities were ever intended for permanent dwelling, or even long stays, but they were clearly built to withstand attack and could support large numbers of people and their domestic animals, for extended periods of time. The urban organization was very complex, and there was probably always work in progress.

hammam-Granada

The Turkish bath, also known as hamam or hammam, is one of the ancient world’s most widely exported customs. The tradition of the Turkish bath was born generations ago, adopted from Romans and Byzantinesand then perfected by the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks and has continued even until today.

In Ottoman times, hamams were social centers, and they were the only baths in Turkey until the mid-20th century when western-style tub-bath-and-shower plumbing began to be accepted.

Today modern Turks may shower in the morning before going to the office, but many still reserve time for a weekly steam-and-scrub at a hamam, a good drying-off with Turkish towels, followed by an hour’s relaxation, tea or Turkish coffee, and conversation with friends—one of life’s small but significant pleasures. When you travel to Turkey, you should experience a Turkish bath. Every Turkish town still has at least one hamam, and cities have many. Most are simple, functional, and inexpensive, but the historic hamams, especially those built by the sultans to serve their imperial mosques, are beautiful works ofOttoman architecture made of fine marble with rich decoration.

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Call Us at : +91 9999979932 & +91 9711623449